Stunning HD Photos of an Amazonian Tribe That Has Never Been Reached By Modern Human Civilization!

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High-definition photos were taken of this tribe covered in body paint and launching arrows at a helicopter. The remote tribe is believed to date back to the Neolithic Age

The photos were taken in the Amazon, deep in the forests of Brazil


National Geographic shares photos of an unreached tribe in the Amazon and it is incredible to see.

National Geographic shares photos of an unreached tribe in the Amazon and it is incredible to see.

While riding in a low-flying helicopter, Brazilian photographer Ricardo Stuckert captured high-resolution images of members of the remote indigenous tribe in a jungle in Jordao, close to the Brazil-Peru border

While hovering around the tribesmen, they were shot at by a barrage of arrows.

“I felt like I was a painter in the last century. To think that in the 21st century, there are still people who have no contact with civilization, living like their ancestors did 20,000 years ago. It’s a powerful emotion,” Stuckert said, as he tried to explain how he felt when he saw the tribesmen.

National Geographic shares photos of an unreached tribe in the Amazon and it is incredible to see.

National Geographic shares photos of an unreached tribe in the Amazon and it is incredible to see.

This is the same tribe that gained global attention in 2008 after officials from Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency, Fundacao Nacional do Índio (FUNAI), showed images of tribesmen in red body paint launching arrows at their low-flying plane to the public.

National Geographic shares photos of an unreached tribe in the Amazon and it is incredible to see.

National Geographic shares photos of an unreached tribe in the Amazon and it is incredible to see.

FUNAI expert José Carlos Meirelles, who has worked with and studied Brazil’s indigenous tribes for more than 40 years, said that these tribes are semi-nomadic. “These groups change locations every four years or so,” said Mr Meirelles, speaking to National Geographic. 

“They move around. But it’s the same group.”

Meirelles was heartened by the crops that he saw near the tribe, a sign of a healthy community. 

The resistance they put up in the form of arrows sent the message that they wanted to be left alone. 

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